Montaje de exposiciones fotográficas de la Tierra tomadas por Don Pettit (NASA)

Don Pettit ISS International Space Station Earth SpaceEstas fotos fueron tomadas por el astronauta de la NASA Don Pettit desde la Estación Espacial Internacional (EEI). ¿Qué son todas estas luces? Encontramos de todo: las luces emitidas desde nuestro planeta, relámpagos recorriendo las nubes, satélites, meteoritos y, por supuesto, la luz de las propias estrellas.
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Y todo ello visto gracias a largas exposiciones fotográficas. Belleza psicoastrodélica en estado puro. Que aproveche.
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Más información:
 “This is a composite of a series of images photographed from a mounted camera on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, from approximately 240 miles above Earth. Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit said of the about photographic techniques used to achieve the images: “My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.” A total of 18 images photographed by the astronaut-monitored stationary camera were combined to create this composite.”
 
El video de Christoph Malin aplicando la técnica Time-lapse:
 
 
In the description of the video, Malin writes: “Stacks make interesting patterns visible, for example lightning corridors within clouds. One can also sometimes recognize satellite tracks and meteors — patterns that are not amongst the main startrails. The many oversaturated hot pixels you see are the result of the very high ISO settings the D3s in use at the ISS have been pushed to keep exposure times low (due to the high speed the ISS has).Unfortunately as there are no dark frames or RAW data available, these are not easy to remove.”
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national Space Station Earth
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